Top Ten DJs at III Points 2022: Red Axes, Loco Dice, Sama’ Abdulhadi, and More


Nine years later, III Points continue to dominate with a tour de force of electronic talent. The festival has grown exponentially and its connection to Club Space means the party goes on from late night until early morning. This non-exhaustive list will guide the raver or visitor who wants to see what electronic music is like in Miami.

So with that, below, in alphabetical order, are the top ten DJs of III Points 2022 that will greet you with bass, four on the floors, and smooth transitions all night long.

Click to enlarge

Ashley’s Venom

Photo courtesy of Life and Death

Ashley’s Venom

Despite playing banger after banger that makes the listener want to stomp the ground so hard it leaves cracks, Miami’s Ashley Venom (AKA Ashley Solage) always maintains a calm demeanor. Even when mixing at over 130 bpm, little can be thrown at it that would disrupt the cosmic dance of precisely mixing abrasive tracks. Sometimes the Haitian-American artist can meet you in the middle — like dropping a remix of Kelis’ “Milkshake” — and provide some sonic R&R. Still, you can rest assured that within minutes you’ll be back dancing and sweating with Venom’s selection of slimy tracks.

Click to enlarge

DJ Harvey

Photo courtesy of Overture

DJ Harvey

The term “legendary” is often used liberally. Queen Elizabeth’s reign was legendary; a nova bagel at Russ & Daughters is legendary; and a DJ Harvey set is, undeniably, legendary. Harvey Bassett cut his teeth on a trip from London to New York in the 80s. In New York he heard hip-hop in its infancy, where the new sound and DJ techniques immediately attracted. Nothing is forbidden with DJ Harvey. A set can bleed into disco, old house proxies, soul, and anything that can be spun with groove-inducing momentum. It’s simple: come for a history lesson and stay for whatever DJ Harvey tells you.

Click to enlarge

nozzle

Photo by Nick Green

nozzle

Supported by equipment to his left and right, Flume’s Australian sets are part human, part musician and part cyborg. Flume’s music is meant to be listened to while driving in a convertible with the city skyline looming. Thick synth lines buzz through your bones and create unfettered emotion that goes beyond your hands in the air. Flume performs as a quasi-DJ and band; the usual all-night mix is ​​replaced with notable song changes and a singing crowd. However, the DJ spirit is displayed brilliantly by an artist who wants you to enjoy the show as much as he has fun playing it.

Click to enlarge

Locomotive dice

Photo by Gianni Cohen.

Locomotive dice

Few DJs can reinvent themselves so much and yet prove their worth every time as Moroccan-born, Düsseldorf-raised DJ/producer Loco Dice. Those deep in Dice’s history may know him as a master German hip-hop selector. Others know of his minimal techno stardom that transcended all speakers. There’s the revamped new Dice, the one that can drop the darkest, dirtiest techno one minute and spruce it up with a Bad Bunny remix shortly after. So whether you live on the dance floor or need a little pick-me-up after James Blake on Friday, Dice can heal whatever ails you and keep you in your happy place for hours and hours.

Click to enlarge

Miss Kittin and the Hacker

Photo by Astrid Raes

Miss Kittin and the Hacker

It took Miss Kittin and the Hacker 13 years to come together – and it was certainly worth it. First album debuted in 2001 and became an electroclash anthem in no time, with hopping synth lines and vocal work by Miss Kittin. Now, the duo (Caroline Hervé and Michel Amato) is back with third album, released on Nobody’s Bizzness in April. The two can mix all night long, but a highlight is when Hervé takes the mic during his sets. The vibe is all their own, and Hervé’s down-to-earth vocals hypnotize as The Hacker layers the whole thing with full-faced synth patterns thought long gone.

Click to enlarge

mystical invoice

Photo by Jorge Garcia

mystical invoice

Dance music would be a yawning affair without Mystic Bill’s hours on the turntables and the blisters on his fingers from crate digging. Bill Torres took his birthright to Chicago in 1988 and would later help put house music on the map. Surprisingly, for a DJ from Miami who has had residencies at Chicago’s Smart Bar and Shelter and who frequently visits Panorama Bar in Berlin, you’d think he would have landed at III Points a long time ago. Well, not quite. Mystic Bill will debut at the festival on Friday with a slew of vinyl records alongside him, including a new EP from Miami Wax Your Cracks Records.

Click to enlarge

DJ Python (left) and Nick León

Photo by Lauren Morell

Nick Leon

It seems like yesterday when new times first interviewed Nick León from Miami. He was a pragmatic young producer who ran the Space Tapes label and lent new ears to the city’s music scene. The new León is essentially the same but now shares producer credits (and heats up the stage) on Rosalía’s Motomami album; sharing a good amount of storage space on the boiler room; and releasing new music non-stop with collaborations from Bitter Babe, DJ Python and INVT. It explores the crossroads between European electronic music and South American genres, combining techno with elements of cumbia, reggeaton and dembow that can bring everyone in Miami to find common ground.

Click to enlarge

Porter Robinson

Photo by Dan Regan

Porter Robinson

Since the Atlanta-born DJ/producer released his debut album, fire eater, in 2011, the artist drew new lines of demarcation for others to follow. His debut was a dubby (with a capital D) homage to the dubstep invasion that sounded like Skrillex had a love child with Pendulum. But since then, Robinson has taken a few steps back. His last album, To feedis music for the morning hike instead of death by a mile womps. Robinson is lighter on the bass and heavier on the heart, drawing long crescendos and emotions from synths and smooth vocals perfect for the late-night festival in the heart of Miami as you hold that special someone close. .

Click to enlarge

red axes

Photo by Gabriel Baharlia

red axes

There’s nothing quite like a total sound overhaul, and the former punk rock duo from Tel Aviv are no exception. Dori Sadovnik and Niv Arzi swapped black leather for glow sticks once they hit the nail on the head in Amsterdam years ago. Soon after, they hit the decks and captured the world with an eclectic mix of raw, trippy sounds in a world of sanitized music. Acid, horns, vocal samples and melodica are all in the game. The two are frequent Magic City travelers and aim to keep the settings simple and quirky in equal measure.

Click to enlarge

Sama’Abdulhadi

Photo by Michele Eve Sandberg

Sama’Abdulhadi

This one’s for the raver who lives by the bass-to-the-face mantra and wants high-octane techno all night long. Sama’ Abdulhadi rose to international fame four years ago with his Boiler Room set live from Palestine. Viewed more than four million times, the set featured the bold and talented producers of the region. But her roots go back to 2006, when she started mixing in Palestine and making a name for herself. Today she has earned the praise of Adam Beyer and Nicole Maudaber and has become an instant favorite in international waters for her heavy techno anthems that hit you deep in the chest and with little room to retreat.

III Points 2022. 3 p.m. to 4 a.m. Friday, Oct. 21 and Saturday, Oct. 22 at Mana Wynwood, 318 NW 23rd St., Miami; iiipoints.com. Tickets cost between $119 and $499 through iiipoints.frontgatetickets.com.

Previous Watch | From Pambai to kombu: this music museum in Chennai showcases traditional Tamil instruments
Next The West Virginia Symphony Orchestra prepares a concert for young people | News, Sports, Jobs